26th October 2015

The taxing matter of sugar reduction

“We are eating too much sugar and it is bad for our health.”  And so begins Public Health England’s much publicised report on how to reduce the nation’s sugar consumption.  Their recommendations are welcome: nutritionists and dietitians have known for some time that foods high in free sugars (refined sugars added to food and those naturally present in honey, fruit juices and the many natural sweeteners like agave, maple syrup and malt extract) contribute to weight gain and should therefore be consumed in moderation.   The more difficult question is how we go about reducing sugar intake across the population.  The debate has been largely overtaken by the focus on the sugar tax, not least because of the support from […]
13th January 2014

Start as you mean to go on

Tired of breaking your New Year’s resolutions before January is out?  Read my article on page 6 of Inspired Health for tips on how to make realistic resolutions that you can sustain for the whole year.
31st July 2013

Fussy eating – a practical and positive approach to helping little ones become good eaters

Research suggests that the UK’s toddlers are the fussiest in Europe, with 26% refusing meals at least once a day, compared to 15% in both France and Germany.  This is an all too familiar statistic for many parents who’ve lovingly created a meal for their little one, only to see it flung across the room or refused with an emphatic “NO!”  Many have speculated about why this may be but here I will attempt to summarise the evidence and give hope to those parents of fussy babies and toddlers.   Start as you mean to go on   By this I mean give your little one the diet you want him or her to eat as an adult when you […]
19th June 2013

Traffic light labels – solution to the obesity epidemic or missing the point?

Today, the Government introduced a new and consistent system of nutritional labelling for manufactured foods.  The combination of traffic lights to indicate low, medium and high levels of key nutrients with a percentage of the guideline daily amount of each nutrient provided by a portion of food is thought to be the most informative to consumers when making food choices.   It’s true that this system may help consumers to compare similar products and chose those that are lower in sugar and fat for example but it somewhat misses the point that we should be educating children in schools about healthy choices, based upon real food ingredients.  Eating unprocessed, real foods and minimising the intake of pre-prepared, highly processed foods […]